Tableau


Tableau’s IPO on May 17 2013 instantly created the most valuable (in terms of Market Capitalization) Data Visualization Vendor. Since then Tableau kept having the best in “BI industry” YoY growth and its sales skyrocketing, almost reaching the level of QLIK sales. During summer of 2014 DATA (stock symbol for Tableau) shares were relatively low and as one visitor to my blog cynically put it, TCC14 (Tableau Customer Conference for 2014) can be easily justified, since it raised DATA Stock and added (indirectly) to Market Cap of Tableau more than $1B to the level of more than $5B. Below is entire history of DATA prices (click on image to enlarge):

DataQlikTibxMstrSinceIPO

Tableau’s IPO on May 17 2013 instantly created the most valuable (in terms of Market Capitalization) Data Visualization Vendor. Since then Tableau kept having the best in “BI industry” YoY growth and its sales skyrocketing, almost reaching the level of QLIK sales. During summer of 2014 DATA (stock symbol for Tableau) shares were relatively low and as one visitor to my blog cynically put it, TCC14 (Tableau Customer Conference for 2014) can be easily justified, since it raised DATA Stock and added (indirectly) to Market Cap of Tableau more than $1B to the level of more than $5B. Below is entire history of DATA prices (click on image to enlarge):

For me the more indicative then the stock prices, market capitalization and a number of participants in customer conferences are numbers of job openings for competing vendors and Tableau has 270+ of them (more than 20% of its current number of employees), QLIK has 120+ (about 7% of its number of employees) and TIBCO has only about 2 dozens of openings related to Spotfire (unless I misread some other openings). For the quarter finished June 30, 2014, the company posted a year-over-year revenue increase of 82% with just over $90 million in revenue. Headcount was up 62% year-over-year to 1,532 employees worldwide.

As a background for Tableau growing sales (and tremendous YoY) you can see slow growth of QLIK sales (QLIK also delayed for almost 3 years the release of new product: we will not see Qlikvew 12, we still waiting for release of QLIK.NEXT and only recent release is Qlik Sense, which does not make too much sense to me) and almost no changes in Spotfire sales. I am guessing that Tableau is taking all those sales away from competition…

Keynotes and sessions of TCC14 were packed (you cannot find available seats on images below) and full of interesting info and even entertainment for new users and customers.

tableau-keynote-2014

These 2 fresh multimillionaires (see below, not sure why Christian’s face looks unhappy – I guess it is just me) opened TCC14 as usual, with exciting keynote.

2MultiMillionairs

You can find their keynote either on TCC14 website (link below) or on Youtube (below TCC14 link). Keynote contains 3+ parts: two speeches from co-founders (this year Christian choose theme of “Data Art” – I am not sure if it help sales,  but nevertheless entertaining and very speculative topic) and the rest of keynote about new features in upcoming release of Tableau (8.3 and 9.0?).

http://tcc14.tableauconference.com/keynote

As you see from slide below, Tableau is positioning new features in 7 groups, and I will try to mention those.

tcc-keynote-features

Let’s start with most interesting to me: potential performance gain 2x or even 4x, mostly because better usage of multithreading and 64-bit code and I quote here: “Vice President of Product Development Andrew Beers takes his turn next, speaking about Performance. He shows breakthroughs in the Viz Engine, flying through a visualized painting, seamlessly panning, zooming, and selecting. Switching into data more likely to be representative, he shows a live connection to a database of 173 million taxi rides in New York City, and dives in showing results easily four times faster than the same calculations run on the same machine running Tableau 8.2, leveraging a change in the Data Engine to use multiple CPU cores in parallel. Database queries will likewise be parallelized, with cited examples reducing 15 second queries to three, and more complex ones reduced from nearly a minute to as little as seven seconds.”

tab_conf_pan

Among other features, Chris introduced “Lasso & Radial Selections”:  these selections allow interactors to select points in shapes other than just a square. In Stolte’s keynote, he used a map as an example. He only wanted to lasso points in a city from the northwest to the southeast, not selecting some along the way. The shape ended up being like a figure eight. This was impressive.

Vice-President of Product Marketing Ellie Fields talked about new developments forthcoming in Cloud computing with Tableau, featuring Tableau Online as a platform for connecting Cloud data warehouses and applications in conjunction with on-premise data which can be presented in web browsers, on mobile devices, or even encapsulated in embedded applications.

Of course the star of TCC14 was Prof. Hans Rosling – as keynoter as well as part of the excited crowd.

HansKeynotingAtTCC14Hans stars even in cafeteria (could not resist to include his picture seating at table with right hand raised).

HansAtTCC14Another memorable event was “ZEN Masters of 2014” –

zens14

this is a living prove of huge and very capable Tableau community

ZenMastersTCC14

Tableau provided during TCC14 a lot of classes and training sessions – almost all of them were well prepared and packed. Expect many of them to be available online – many for free.

TCC14_TrainingSessionI included below two video interviews, showing insider’s take on Tableau as Sales Organization

and also Tableau’s approach to Product management with these priorities (I am curious if they always followed in real life): Quality – Schedule – Features.

 

 

While on Cape Cod this summer and when away from beach, I enjoyed some work-unrelated fun with Tableau. My beach reading included this article: http://www.theinformationlab.co.uk/2014/03/27/radar-charts-tableau-part-3/ by Andrew Ball and I decided to create my own Radar. When I show it to coworkers later, they suggested to me to publish it (at least the fun with Polygons, Path and Radars) on my blog. I may reuse this Radar chart for our internal Web Analytics. CloudsOverAtlantic

Natural Order of Points and Segments in Line.

Many visualization tools will draw the line chart, its datapoints and connecting line segments between datapoints in natural progressing order – repainting them from left to right (horizontal ordering by Axis X) or from bottom to upside
(vertical ordering by Axis Y) or vice versa.

Path as the method to break the Natural Order.

Some demanding visualizations and users wish to break the natural repainting and drawing order and Tableau allows to do that by using the Path as the method to order the datapoints and line segments in Lines and Polygons. A Collection of increasing Ordering Numbers (Pathpoints) for each Datapoint in Line defined a Path for drawing and connecting datapoints and segments of that Line (or Polygon). Each Pathpoint can be predefined or calculated, depends on mplementation and business logic.
Changing the Natural Order can create “artificial” and unusual situations, when two or more datapoints occupying the same pixels on drawing surface but have very different Pathpoints (example can be a Polygon, when Line ends in the same point it starts) or when two or more Line Segments intersecting in the same Pixel on screen (example can be the Center of the letter X ).

Radar.

Radar Chart has 2 parts: Radar Grid (background) and Radar Polygons (showing repetitive Data Patterns, if linear timeline can be collapsed into circular “timeline”). Radar Grid has Radials (with common Center) and Concentric Rings.
Polygons optionally can be filled with (transparent) color. For future Discussion let’s use the RMax as the maximal possible distance between the Center of Radar Grid (in case of Radar Grid) or the Center of Radar Polygon (in case of Radar
Polygon) and the most remote Datapoint shown in Radar Grid or Polygon respectively. We will use the “normalized” statistics of Visits to typical Website to visualize the hourly and daily (by day of the week) patterns of Web Visitations. By
normalization we mean the removal of insignificant deviations from “normal” hourly and daily amounts of Web Visits. For complete obfuscation we will assume for Demo purposes that RMax = 144.

Radar Radial Grid.

Radial Grid contains a few Radiuses (equidistant from each other) and we will draw each Radius as 3-point line where Starting and Ending points of each line are identical to each other and collocated with the Center of Radar. For Demo Web Visitation Radar we will use Radial Grid with 8 Radiuses, corresponding to the following hours of the complete 24-hours day: 0, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, 21:
radials
For example see the Radius, corresponding to HOUR = 3 (below in light brown, other Radiuses greyed out on that image):
Radiuses3
And for that Radius we are using (redundantly) the following 3 datapoints:
Radius3Data

Concentric Rings for Radar Grid.

For Demo Radar we will use 4 Concentric Rings, corresponding to 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% levels of maximum visitation per hour:
Rings
Each ring is a line with 25 datapoints, where Starting and Ending Points collocated/equal. For example, dataset for external Ring (red line above) looks like this:
Ring1Data
When Radials and Concentric Rings collocated and overlaid they represent the Radar Grid, ready to be a background for Radar Chart:
Background

Radar Polygons.

For Demo purposes we use only 2 Polygons – one (largest) representing average Hourly Visits during Weekday and 2nd Polygon representing average Hourly Visits during Weekend day. For Websites which I observed the minimum number of visits happened around 1 AM, so you will see both Polygons are slightly rotated clockwise and slightly shifted up from the Center of Radar Grid to reflect the fact that the minimum number of visitors (even around 1 AM) is slightly more then 0. Each Radar Polygon (in our Demo) has 25 Data Points with Starting and Ending Points collocated at 1AM. Here is a Weekday Polygon, overlaid with Radar Grid:
weekday
Here are the data for Weekday Polygon: 

PolygonForWeekdayData

Here is a Polygon for Weekend day, overlaid with Radar Grid:

weekend

Radar Chart.

When Radar Grid and Radar Polygons overlaid (Polygons transparent but on top of
Grid) we will get the Radar Chart. Please note that Centers of Radar Grid and Radar
Polygons can have different locations:

RadarChart

 

I published Tableau workbook with this Demo Radar Chart and Radar Data here: 

https://public.tableausoftware.com/profile/andrei5435#!/vizhome/radar/Radar

Visitors to this blog keep asking me to estimate Tableau Software prices (including for Tableau Online), even Tableau published all non-server prices on its website here: https://tableau.secure.force.com/webstore However this does not include discounts, especially for enterprise volume of buying no pricing for servers of any kind (at least 2 kinds of server licenses exist) and no pricing for consulting and training.

Thanks to website of Tableau Partner “Triad Technology Partners” we have a good estimate of all Tableau prices (they are always subject of negotiations) in form of so called GSA Schedule (General Services Administration, Federal Acquisition Service, Special Items: No. 132-33 Perpetual Software Licenses, No. 132-34 Maintenance of Software as a Service, No. 132-50 Training Courses) for Tableau Software Products and Services, see it here:

http://www.triadtechpartners.com/vendors/tableau-software/ here (for example it includes prices for IBM Cognos and others):
http://www.triadtechpartners.com/contracts/ and specific Tableau Prices here:
http://www.triadtechpartners.com/wp-content/uploads/Tableau-GSA-Price-List-April-2013.pdf

I grouped Tableau’s Prices (please keep in mind that TRIAD published GSA schedule in April 2013, so it is 1 year old prices, but they are good enough for estimating purposes)  in 5 groups below: Desktop, Server with licensing for Named Users (makes sense if you have less then hundred “registered” users), Core Licenses for Tableau Server (recommended when you have more then 150 “registered” users), Consulting and Training Prices:

Google sheet for spreadsheet above is here:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1oCyXRR3B6dqXcw-8cE05ApwsRcxckgA6QdvF9aF6_80/edit?usp=sharing
and image of it – for those who has misbehaved browsers is below:
TableauPrices2013

Again, please keep in mind that above just an estimate for prices (except for Tableau Online), based on 2013 GSA Schedule, and a good negotiator can always get a good discount (I got it each time I tried). You may also wish to review more general article from Boris Evelson here:

http://blogs.forrester.com/boris_evelson/14-04-22-a_common_denominator_for_pricing_and_negotiating_business_intelligence_bi_and_analytics_software#comment-27689

Note about choice between Core License and Server License with Named Users: I know organizations who choose to keep Named Users Licensing instead of switching to Core License even with more then 300 registered users, because it allows them to use much more capable hardware (with much more CPU Cores).

We were told (5+ month ago) what to expect from Tableau 8.2 (originally @TCC13 they said Release can be before the end of the winter of 2014; however in the latest Earnings Call here: http://seekingalpha.com/article/1994131-tableau-softwares-ceo-discusses-q4-2013-results-earnings-call-transcript CEO acknowledged the delay: 8.2 in Q2 of 2014, and v.9 in “first half of 2015″, many months later then original plan), including:

  • Tableau for MAC (very timely at time when QLIK about to abandon the Qlikview Desktop in favor of HTML5 Client),
  • Story Points (new type of worksheet/dashboard with mini-slides as story-points, so bye-bye to Powerpoint),
  • seamless access to data via data connection interface to visually build a data schema, including inner/left/right/outer joins,
  • ability to beautify the columns names.

306151016_640

I am sure Tableau already has a Roadmap for Tableau 9 and beyond, but I accumulated a list of wishes for it (may be it is not too late to include some of it to Roadmap?). This Wishlist is rather about backend than about front-end Eye Candies (the nature of the Large Enterprise dictates that). Here it is:

  • Visual ETL functionality and Data Quality Validation/Cleaning;
  • (thanks to Larry Keller): Enterprise Repository for pre-Validated Sharable Regularly Refreshed Data Extracts, Data Connections and Data Sources;
  • Ability to collect Data automatically (say Machine-generated or/and transactional Data) and Visually (say from Humans, filling Data-Entry Forms), both tied to already predefined and/or modifiable Data Extracts;
  • Visual Data Modeling;
  • Free Tableau Reader for Mac (since we are going to have Tableau Desktop for Mac in Tableau 8.2 anyway), iOS, Android and Linux;
  • Real-Time Visualization, support (Spotfire and Datawatch have it!) for Complex Event Processing (CEP), Visual Alerts and Alarms;
  • Scripting for Visual Predictive Modeling and Visual Data Mining with ability to do it in Visual IDE and minimal Coding;
  • Better integration with R (current integration is limited to 4 functions passing parameters to R Server), with Visual IDE and minimal or NO Coding.
  • Enterprise-wide source control and change management.
  • Please allow to share Data Visualizations (read-only) from Tableau Online for free (learn from Spotfire Cloud, it called Public Folder!), otherwise it will be too much of usage of free Tableau Reader.  Currently, in order to access to published on Tableau Online workbooks Tableau by default requiring the extra subscription, which is wrong from my point of view, because you can just publish it on Public Folder of such site (similar to what Spotfire Cloud does). By default Tableau Online does not allow the usage of Public Folder, which contradicts the spirit of Tableau Reader and creates unnecessary negative feeling toward Tableau.
  • Enterprise-wide reuse of workbooks and visual designs etc.

preTableau

Since Tableau is going into enterprise full speed (money talks?) then it needs to justify its pricing for Tableau Server, especially if Tableau wish to stay there for long. Feel free to add to this list (use comments or email for it). The first addition I got in a few hours after posting the Wishlist above from Mr. Damien Lesage, see 3 additions from Damien below and his entire comment below of this blogpost:

  • Tableau Server for Linux (I actually advocated it for a while since Microsoft changed (made CALs more expensive, now it looks to me as unwarranted taxation) its Client Access Licensing for Window Server 2012). For comparison Spotfire Server for Linux and Solaris existed for years: http://support.spotfire.com/sr_spotfireserver60.asp , and it is one of reasons why large enterprises may choose Spotfire over Tableau or Qlikview;
  • Extra visualization capability: hierarchical, network and graph representations of data (do we need an approval of Stephen Few for that?);
  • Ability for extract engine to distribute extracts between different servers to allow to load them more quickly and support bigger datasets (I suggest additional ability to do it on workstations too, especially with Tableau Desktops installed and it means they have TABLEAU.COM executable installed anyway)

Suggestion from Mike Borner (see his comment below):

  • ability to report metadata/calculated fields

Now I can extend my best wishes for you onto 2015 due the delay of Tableau 9!

Google+

Tableau Software (symbol DATA) did something that nobody or almost nobody in BI and/or Data Visualization (DV) field did before with this or larger size of Revenue. Tableau in their last Quarter of 2013 Fiscal Year (reported last week) increased their Year-over-Year Ratio for both Quarterly accounting (95%) and Yearly accounting (82%, way above all DV and BI competitors) while dramatically increased their Revenue to $232M per Year, see it here: http://investors.tableausoftware.com/investor-news/investor-news-details/2014/Tableau-Announces-Fourth-Quarter-and-Full-Year-2013-Financial-Results/default.aspx.

You can compare on diagram below the growth of 3 competitors over last 6 years (2008-2013, Spotfire sales unavailable since TIBCO (symbol TIBX) bought it): BI veteran Microstrategy (bluish line slowing down last 2+ years), largest DV vendor Qliktech (symbol QLIK, red line, decreasing Year-over-Year growth) and fastest growing DV Vendor Tableau (yellow line with Record Year-over-Year growth):

DVMomentum2008_2013a

Tableau stock was and is overpriced since its IPO (e.g. today EPS is -0.19 and P/E ratio is very high, see it here: http://ycharts.com/companies/DATA/pe_ratio). If you follow Warren Buffet (Buy Low, Sell High), today is a good day to sell a DATA stock, unless you intend to hold it for long or forever. However many people ignore Warren and volume of buying for last few days was above average (780K for DATA) and above 1 million shares per day (e.g. on 2/5/14 it was 4.4M of shares). On OpenInsider you can find at least 2 people, who agreed with Warren and sold during last few days 700000 Tableau’s shares for total $62M+ (guess who it can be? Chris and Christian – part of 1% since 5/17/13 IPO…):

http://openinsider.com/screener?fd=0&td=365&s=DATA&o=&sicMin=&sicMax=&t=s&minprice=&maxprice=&v=0&sortcol=0&maxresults=500

As the result, the $DATA (Tableau’s Symbol) jumped up $10+ from already overvalued share price to $97+ after 2/14/14, today it added $5 (click on image below to enlarge it) to share price and keeps going up:

DATAvsQLIKvsTIBXvsDWCH_110413to021414

BY end of 2/14/14 Tableau’s Market Capitalization went over $5.96B, twice more then Qliktech’s MarketCap (which is almost the same as a year ago) and $2B more then TIBCO’s MarketCap (which is almost the same as a year ago)! Basically, Tableau’s MarketCap as of end of trading day today is almost the same as combined MarketCap of QLIK and TIBX.

For me the more important indicator of company’s growth is a “HRI” (Hiring Rate Indicator as the ratio of the number of open positions to the number of Full-Time employees of the company). As of today, Tableau has 216 job openings (current estimate is has about 1100 employees), Qliktech has 101 openings (while employed 1700 people) and Spotfire has about 34 open positions (current estimate of number of Spotfire Employees is difficult because it is completely inside TIBCO, but probably still below 500). It means that Tableau’s HRI is 19.6%, Qliktech’s HRI is 5.9% and Spotfire’s HRI is below 6.8%.

This is a repost from Data Visualization Consulting Page.

Visitors of this blog generated a lot of requests for my Data Visualization “Advice” (small projects for a few hours or days, no NDA [Non-Disclosure Agreement] involved), for Data Visualization Consulting projects (a few weeks or months; I tend to avoid the NDAs as they can interfere with my blogging activities) and even for Full-time work (for example my latest full-time job I got because my employer often visited and read my blog; NDA needed).

Additionally, sometimes I am doing free-of-charge work, if involved projects are short, extremely interesting for me and beneficial for my Data Visualization Blog, like this project:

http://apandre.wordpress.com/2014/01/12/motion-map-chart/

Obviously all these projects can be done only when I have spare time either from full-time work and/or other projects, duties and activities.

I also cannot relocate or travel, so I can do it mostly from my home office – telecommuting (RDP, Skype, phone, WebEx, GoToMeeting etc.) or if client is local to Massachusetts, then sometime I can visit Client’s site, see below the Map of my Local “Service Area” – part of Middlesex County between Routes 495, 3 and 20 – where I can commute to Client’s Location (please click on map below to enlarge the image) :

DVServiceArea

If I do have time for short-term advisory projects (from 2 hours to 2 weeks), clients usually pay by the highest rate, similar to what Qliktech, Spotfire, Tableau or IBM charging for their Consulting Services (I consider my consulting as better service than theirs…). If you will go to this thread on Tableau Community:

http://community.tableausoftware.com/thread/127338 then you will find these Indicative Rates for Consulting Tableau Work (Qlikview and Spotfire Rates are very similar):

Low $125,  Max $300,  Average around $175 per hour.

Here are the most popular requests for my Advisory work:

  • Visual Design and Architectural Advice for Monitoring or Operational Dashboard(s);
  • Review of Data Visualization Work done by my Clients;
  • Prototyping of Data Visualizations (most requested by my visitors);
  • My opinion on Strengths and Weaknesses of Data Visualization Vendor/Product, requested by trader, portfolio or hedge fund manager(s)
  • Advice about what Hardware to buy (say to get the most from Tableau License client has);
  • Advice what Charts and Filters to use for given Dataset and Business Logic;
  • Technical Due Diligence on Data Visualization Startup for Venture Capitalists investing into that Start-up.
  • Etc…

3Paths4Options

For mid-size projects (from 2 weeks to 6 months) clients getting a “Progressive” discount – the longer the project then the larger the discount. Here are the most popular requests for my Consulting Data Visualization Work:

  • Comparing Data Visualization Product vs. Other Visualization Product for specific Client’s needs and projects;
  • Comparing Clients’s Visualization Product vs. Competitor(s) Visualization Product (most requested);
  • Benchmarking one or more Visualization Product(s) vs. specific data and application logic.
  • Managed Clients migration of their Reporting and Analytical IT Infrastructure from obsolete BI Platforms like Business Objects, Cognos and Microstrategy to modern Data Visualization Environments like Tableau, Qlikview and Spotfire.
  • Etc.

Solution

Full-time work (1 year or more engagements) is not exactly a Consulting but Full-time job when clients asking me to join their company. These jobs are similar to what I had in the past: Director of Visual Analytics, Data Visualization Director, VP of Data Visualization, Principal Data Visualization Consultant, Tableau Architect etc. Here are samples of full-time projects:

  • Created, Maintained and Managed the Data Visualization Consulting Practices for my company/employer;
  • Led the growth of Data Visualization Community (the latest example – 4000 strong Tableau Community) with own Blog, Portal and User Group behind the corporate firewall, created Dozens of near-real-time Monitoring Dashboards for Analytical and Data Visualization Communities;
  • Designed and Implemented myself hundreds of Practical Data Visualizations and Visual Reports, which led to discovery of trends, outliers, clusters and other Data Patterns, Insights and Actions;
  • Created hundreds of Demos, Prototypes and Presentations for Business Users;
  • Designed Data Visualization Architecture and Best Practices for Dozen of Analytical Projects;
  • Significantly improved the Mindshare and increased the Web Traffic to website of my company, Created and Maintained the Data Visualization blog for it.

You can find more observations about relationship between Full-Time salary and Hourly Rate for consulting in my previous post (from 6 months ago) here: http://apandre.wordpress.com/2013/07/11/contractors-rate/

8 years ago Hans Rosling demoed on TED the Motion Chart, using Gapminder’s Trendalizer. 7 years ago Google bought Trendalizer and incorporated into Google Charts.

A while ago, for my own education and for demo purposes, I implemented various Motion Charts using:

To implement Motion Chart in Tableau, you can use Page Shelf and place there either a Timing dimension (I used Dimension “Year” in Tableau example above) or even Measures Names (Average Monthly Home Value per ZIP Code) in my implementation of Motion Map Chart below.

AverageHomeValuePerZipCode

Tableau’s ability to move through pages (automatically when Tableau Desktop or Tableau Reader are in use and manually when Data Visualization hosted by Tableau Server and accessed through Web Browser) enabling us to create all kind of Motion Charts, as long as Visualization Author will put onto Pages a Time, Date or Timestamp variables, describing a Timeline. For me the most interesting was to make a Filled Map (Chart Type supported by Tableau, which is similar to Choropleth Map Charts) as a Motion Map Chart, see the result below.

As we all know, 80% of any Data Visualization are Data and I found the appropriate Dataset @Zillow Real Estate Research here: http://www.zillow.com/blog/research/data/ . Dataset contains Monthly Sales Data for All Homes (SFR, Condo/Co-op) for entire US from 1997 until Current Month (so far for 12604 ZIP Codes, which is only 25% of all USA ZIP codes) – average for each ZIP Code area.

This Dataset covers 197 Months and contains about 2.5 millions of DataPoints. All 5 Dimensions in Dataset are very “Geographical”: State, County, Metro Area, City and ZIP code (to define the “Region” and enable Tableau to generate a Longitude and Latitude) and each record has 197 Measures – the Average Monthly Home Prices per Given Region (which is ZIP Code Area) for each available Month since 1997.

In order to create a Motion Filled Map Chart, I put Longitude as Column and Latitude as Row, Measure Values as Color, Measure Names (except Number of Records) as Pages, States and Measure Names as Filters and State and ZIP code as Details and finally Attribute Values of County, Metro Area and City as Tooltips. Result I published on Tableau Public here:

http://public.tableausoftware.com/views/zhv/ZillowHomeValueByZIP_1997-2013#1 ,

so you can review it online AND you can download it and use it within Tableau Reader or Tableau Desktop as the automated Motion Map Chart.

For Presentation and Demo purposes I created the Slides and Movie (while playing it don’t forget to setup a Video Quality to HD resolution) with Filled Map Chart colored by Home Values for entire USA in 2013 as a Starting points and with 22 follow-up steps/slides: Zoom to Northeast Map, colored by 2013 Values, Zoom to SouthEastern New England 2013, start the Motion from Southeastern New England, colored  by 1997 Home Values per each ZIP Code and then automatic Motion through all years from 1997 to 2014, then Zoom to Eastern Massachusetts and finally Zoom to Middlesex County in Massachusetts, see movie below:

Here the content of this video as the presentation with 24 Slides:

Now I think it is appropriate to express my New Year Wish (I repeating it for a few years in a row) that Tableau Software Inc. will port the ability to create AUTOMATED Motion Charts from Tableau Desktop and Tableau Reader to Tableau Server. Please!

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